30 second time outs

Sunday, May 30, 2010

Vintage Hoop Notes

Here is a new feature that should be interesting. From time to time I'll scan some old hoop notes and post them. One - it will be fun to share and two - it will force me to go over some of my old stuff. If you've been coaching for a while you probably have a veritable clinic in your file cabinet. Take out a folder now and then and "re-learn"
Alvin Gentry Conditioners
(from Self-Improvement Clinic, 1987)
If you have any questions about the individual drills go ahead and comment and I'll explain.

Tuesday, May 25, 2010

ZONE OFFENSIVE PRINCIPLES

Zone defenses, at times, are our biggest nightmare. I heard Larry Brown (College and NBA Head Coach) once say that when he plays a zone defense he feels the other team will make EVERY outside shot, and when the opponent plays a zone he thinks his team will NEVER make an outside shot. I feel the same way sometimes. Players need to understand WHY they are attacking a zone in a particular way. Concentrate on the SKILLS of the game, not just SYSTEMS. Understand these "principles" not just running "the play". A good grasp of some of the following zone offensive "habits" will put your mind at ease. A little bit.
To start your zone offense it is a good idea to get in a "GAP ALIGNMENT". Against an even front zone (2-1-2, or 2-3) get in an odd front set (1-3-1,1-2-2 or 1-4). Against an odd front zone, get in an even front set. This is to make two defenders think about which one should guard you. If a defender is in a direct line between you and the basket-MOVE. Basically, put players where the defense isn’t.

Try to get some GAP PENETRATION. Dribble into a gap, dish to the basket or kick out to a shooter but look to pass to where the defender comes from. Only dribble to improve a passing angle into the post. The second time a player touches the ball on a possession is a good time to look for this type of penetration.

Move the ball and move players to DISTORT THE ZONE. Dribble drag a defender, drive a gap, improve passing angles, screen, skip, swing, cut, flash, or overload to shift the zone. FREEZE THE ZONE by taking 1 or 2 dribbles AT a defender-pass or kick it to the perimeter. After the zone has shifted-use pass fakes & shot fakes.

Remember the 3 D’s-Drive, Draw, Dish. Inside players should look to SEAL THE ZONE. After the zone has shifted the posts can seal high or low IF the defense is INSIDE the offense. Reseal the next man in the zone after the defender BREAKS the seal.

MAKE THE ZONE RUN via the PASS, move the ball quickly-don‘t hold it any longer than a ball fake, seal, skip, and swing. Show some PATIENCE AGAINST THE ZONE. Move the ball, move players, look for cutters, check all options-in order. Take the high percentage shots that you want to take WHEN you want to take them.

However, the best way to combat a zone defense may be to BEAT THE ZONE UP THE FLOOR. Defensive rebound & run your fast break and attack on offense before the zone even gets set.

Saturday, May 22, 2010

Respect Yourself

Players should Respect Themselves by living up to their high standards of performance & behavior-even when others aren't http://is.gd/ck6GqSat May 22 07:12:28 via TweetDeck

Wednesday, May 19, 2010

Vintage Hoop Notes

Here is a new feature that should be interesting. From time to time I'll scan some old hoop notes and post them. One - it will be fun to share and two - it will force me to go over some of my old stuff. If you've been coaching for a while you probably have a veritable clinic in your file cabinet. Take out a folder now and then and "re-learn"
INDIVIDUAL PERMITER WORKOUT

If you have any questions about the individual drills go ahead and comment and I'll explain.

Monday, May 17, 2010

The Tribe Has Spoken

I'll admit it - I'm a "Survivor" junkie. First of all, I'm a sucker for any kind of competition, and the team and physical challenges are usually pretty creative and typically quite grueling. As exciting as the challenges are the group dynamics and social interaction is just as intriguing. Plus - there's always a "basketball type" challenge every season.
The fact that you compete against a group that determines who might be sent home then have to decide who to vote off all while creating alliances that could help you now - or later in the game. Winning individual challenges down the stretch gives survivors immunity from being voted out during crucial "Tribal Councils." The irony is that the competitors that you vote to send home are also the ones that sit on a jury that decides the ultimate winner. While some players resort to lying or going back on their word during a vote to advance in the game, the trend has been for the jury is to vote for the player that played the most "honorable" game. This has created some winners that haven't necessarily "played the game", but have flown under the radar, ridden some coattails and essentially... "Survived."

Now the motto of Survivor is to "Outplay-Outwit-Outlast"and while the first two are important, I suppose the last one is the most important. What concerns me a lot after the last two seasons is the public's voting on their "Favorite Survivor." The past two seasons the public's vote has NOT recognized those that have played "honorably" and have instead awarded a Survivor that has deceived, lied, threatened, and verbally abused tribe members. I hope it is not a trend in society that we respect those traits and poor sportsmanship... or maybe he was just a player "you loved to hate."

Friday, May 14, 2010

Vintage Hoop Notes

Here is a new feature that should be interesting. From time to time I'll scan some old hoop notes and post them. One - it will be fun to share and two - it will force me to go over some of my old stuff. If you've been coaching for a while you probably have a veritable clinic in your file cabinet. Take out a folder now and then and "re-learn"
INDIVIDUAL POST WORKOUT


If you have any questions about the individual drills go ahead and comment and I'll explain.

Monday, May 10, 2010

THE DRIBBLE WEAVE - BASKETBALL`S RETRO OFFENSE"

Just like fashions and furnishings, certain basketball strategies travel in cycles and make a comeback every now and then. In the 60`s the Boston Celtics (and even the Harlem Globetrotters) made the dribble weave a very popular offense. With the advent of the passing game dribbling was discouraged and the weave went by the wayside. When defenses started to really pressure passes, dribble penetration became a major strategy again - hence the return of the dribble weave and the importance of the Dribble Handoff. Dribble Handoffs (DHO`s) when properly executed, are very similar to the pick and roll. The major difference is that the "pick" is essentially being executed by the player with the ball. What makes this most effective is how do you call an "illegal screen" on the player with the ball?

When the DHO is executed correctly, and most effectively, the dribbler should dribble directly at the defender of his teammate who will receive the handoff. While that is happening the receiver of the handoff should take a couple of hard steps in the opposite direction to divert his defenders attention and "set him up". Prior to any contact, the dribbler should come to a jump stop and execute a 1/4 reverse pivot holding the ball "on a platter"(with the palm up) for the cutter to accept the handoff. The dribbler, essentially, is setting a screen on the defender. As in using a screen, the player receiving the handoff should try to cut very close to the dribbler and leave no room for his defender to squeeze thru.

Accepting the handoff is an art in itself. To avoid any possibility of the ball slipping thru the receivers hand and to be best suited to handle the basketball, the hand closest to the dribbler should be behind the ball. To do this the receivers elbow should be tight to the body and by the hip with the fingers facing upward. Now the player simply allows those skyward fingers to accept the ball off of the "platter".

These skills should not be taken for granted and should be incorporated into any DHO drill that you may do. Common mistakes such as the dribbler "shoving" the ball into the gut of his teammate like a football handoff, the receiver trying to put a hand on each side of the basketball, or the dribbler just leaving the dribble behind to be picked up could result in the basketball being mishandled and lead to unnecessary turnovers.

When executed properly, the DHO can be added to the backdoor and the pick and roll as valuable counters to denied passes and a great misdirection play to incorporate into any offense.

Friday, May 07, 2010

Alvin Gentry thinks "Mistakes are OK"

"Be aggressive. you make a couple mistakes - that's fine... just be agressive!"

Is this the "ME" you want them to see?

Athletes - are we seeing the "ME" you want us to see? http://chir.ps/4SYless than a minute ago via TweetDeck

Saturday, May 01, 2010

Structuring Your Practice

The will to prepare is more important than the will to win.- - Bob Knight

The following practice structure chart helps the coach cover the all aspects of the game and ensures that they are emphasized accordingly. Listed in columns are things that we do every day, every other day, skills and strategies that are covered weekly, or just occasionally. What the drills are, specifically, isn't as important as having your favorite drills organized in a similar way.

Using a daily practice plan ensures that you’ll be prepared throughout practice. I like something simple with a place to draw diagrams if necessary. Try to adhere to the time as much as possible. Avoid going too long on a drill in an attempt to “get it right”. Sometimes going longer actually makes it worse. At times it’s better to just move on to the next item and come back to the next practice. I’d make a seasons worth of copies, with this Daily Practice Structure on the back. Looking at them in a 3-Ring binder, I’\d have the Structure on one page and the Plan on the other for easy planning. After practice I could then make notes for the next practice

During the PRE-PRACTICE segment, as players walk into the gym they get a basketball and do some individual ballhandling. Once they have a partner, they go to a basket and begin a shooting progression starting from in close.

A WALK-THRU follows going 1/2 speed and working on footwork, timing and execution. This is the time when the players minds are the most fresh and they should be able to absorb more information. This time typically involves more talking and instruction using the time before the body of practice is most efficient. Take precautions that this does not become competitive because players are not properly warmed up.

For WARM UP I prefer to gradually ease into a practice. After the ballhandling, shooting, and walk thru a series of footwork and passing drills is good to get the players moving and ready to compete. By this time players are in a full sweat and should work on fundamentals of offense & defense at game speed .

The FACTORY is where we go to work every day to improve our fundamentals and build our game. We do a variety of 3-5 minute drills in small groups at a very intense pace. This is most effective with supervision at each basket. Coaches should be active and motivating throughout the factory to keep the players working hard and executing properly. Anytime these drills can be made to simulate a game situation the players will benefit.

When SHOOTING, it’s important to shoot game shots from game spots at game speed. A variety of competitive shooting drills is good to keep the players fresh and motivated, but try not to fall into the trap of spending too much time “teaching” drills instead of skills.

During TEACHING segments we stop play for most teaching points and corrections. We really work on execution during these times. Slippage should not be tolerated and perfection is the goal.

The last part of practice consists of a series of COMPETITIVES that simulate game situations. We try to let them play and not stop for corrections too much. If any teaching is needed, we will sub and correct the players on the side. This way there is more continuity and flow. Winners get a drink, others condition.

It may be best to use CONDITIONERS during the body of practice, and with a ball, then players don't "save themselves" for the sprints after practice. Using them after competitive drills tends to make players a little more conscious of the score and provides an opportunity to reward winners with a little less running. Practicing free throws after conditioning is very game like and simulates shooting when fatigued, as in a game.

It’s important to periodically work on SPECIAL SITUATIONS covering various game situations and conditions. That way players are prepared for anything that may occur and be ready for most time and score scenarios.

The single most important thing for a coach to stress on any interscholastic team is the student/athletes’ ACADEMIC PERFORMACE. REVIEW FOLDERS will help keep track of every players progress. Each player could have a personal folder containing information on class schedule, grades and standardized test scores. A coach can update 2 or 3 players folder’s a day simply by asking players about their tests, assignments, projects, attendance, and behavior. By the end of the week each athlete will have had at least one conversation with a coach about the players grades.

Lok's Ledger